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Onsite Cyber Incident Response

Onsite cyber incident response refers to the process of responding to a cybersecurity incident at the physical location of the affected organization.

This type of response is typically necessary when an incident cannot be effectively managed remotely and requires the presence of experienced security professionals on site


 

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1. Mobilization

The onsite incident response process typically involves the following steps:

Mobilization:

Mobilization is the first step in the onsite cyber incident response process. It refers to the process of assembling a team of security professionals and deploying them to the location of the affected organization. The goal of mobilization is to ensure that the incident response team is on site as quickly as possible so that the incident can be effectively managed and contained.  

 

Our Cyber Incident Response vehicle will be dispatched with members from our Incident Response Team that contains all the tools necessary to work remotely.

The mobilization process typically involves the following steps:

1. Notification: The incident response team is notified of the incident, either by the affected organization or by an automated system.

2. Team Assembly: The incident response team is assembled and prepared for deployment to the affected location. This may involve selecting team members with the appropriate skills and experience, ensuring that necessary equipment and supplies are available, and coordinating with the affected organization to arrange for access to the site.

3. Deployment: The incident response team is deployed to the affected location, either by traveling to the site or by connecting to the site remotely.

4. Initial Assessment: Upon arrival at the affected location, the incident response team will conduct an initial assessment of the situation to determine the extent of the damage and to determine the best course of action. This may involve reviewing logs and other data, interviewing key personnel, and conducting a physical examination of systems and equipment.

Mobilization is a critical step in the onsite incident response process as it helps to ensure that the incident response team is on site as quickly as possible to manage and contain the incident. Effective mobilization requires careful planning, coordination, and a well-trained incident response team to ensure that the incident response process is carried out in a thorough and effective manner.

 

 

2. Initial  
  Assessment

 Initial Assessment:

The Initial Assessment is the second step in the onsite cyber incident response process. It involves a preliminary evaluation of the situation to determine the extent of the damage caused by the incident and to determine the best course of action. The goal of the initial assessment is to gain a comprehensive understanding of the incident so that the incident response team can effectively contain the damage and minimize the impact on the affected organization.

1. Data Collection: The incident response team will collect data about the incident, including information about affected systems and devices, as well as any logs or other relevant information. This may involve reviewing system logs, interviewing key personnel, and conducting a physical examination of systems and equipment.

2. Damage Assessment: The incident response team will assess the extent of the damage caused by the incident, including the scope of the breach, the type of data that may have been compromised, and any systems or devices that have been impacted.

3. Impact Assessment: The incident response team will assess the impact of the incident on the affected organization, including any disruption to operations, loss of data, and financial losses.

4. Threat Analysis: The incident response team will analyze the threat that caused the incident, including its origin, motivation, and methods used to carry out the attack. This information is used to determine the best course of action for containment and recovery.

The initial assessment is a critical step in the onsite incident response process as it provides the foundation for the containment and recovery efforts that follow. It is important for the incident response team to be thorough and systematic in their initial assessment to ensure that all relevant information is gathered and analyzed, and to avoid overlooking critical details that could impact the effectiveness of the response.

3. Containment

Containment:

Containment is the third step in the onsite cyber incident response process. It involves implementing measures to stop the spread of the incident and to prevent further damage from occurring. The goal of containment is to limit the impact of the incident and to preserve evidence that may be required for further investigation and recovery efforts.

The containment process typically involves the following steps:

1. Isolation: The incident response team will isolate affected systems and devices to prevent the spread of the incident. This may involve disconnecting systems from the network, physically unplugging devices, or implementing firewalls or other network-based controls.

2. Eradication: The incident response team will take steps to eradicate the threat, including removing malware or other malicious code, patching vulnerabilities, and updating security measures.

3. Stabilization: The incident response team will stabilize the affected systems and devices, including restoring normal operations and re configuring systems to their pre-incident state.

4. Evidence Preservation: The incident response team will preserve evidence related to the incident, including system logs, network traffic, and other relevant data that may be required for further investigation and analysis.

Containment is a critical step in the onsite incident response process as it helps to minimize the impact of the incident and to preserve evidence for further analysis. Effective containment requires a well-planned and executed response, as well as a thorough understanding of the threat and the systems and devices that have been impacted. The incident response team must work quickly and efficiently to implement containment measures to limit the spread of the incident and to prevent further damage from occurring.

 

4. Evidence
    Collection

Evidence Collection:

Evidence Collection is the process of gathering and preserving information related to a cybersecurity incident for the purpose of conducting an investigation, determining the cause of the incident, and taking appropriate legal or administrative action. Evidence collection is a critical component of incident response and must be carried out in a systematic and thorough manner to ensure the preservation of relevant information and to avoid contamination or loss of evidence.

The steps involved in evidence collection include:

1. Planning: This involves developing a plan for collecting evidence that takes into account the type of incident, the scope of the investigation, and the types of evidence that may be relevant.

2. Preservation: The first step in evidence collection is to preserve the evidence in its original state to prevent any changes or alterations to the data. This may involve taking steps to prevent further damage, such as shutting down systems or disconnecting devices from the network.

3. Collection: The next step is to collect the evidence. This may involve copying data from systems and devices, taking screenshots, or acquiring network logs. It is important to follow established protocols and chain of custody procedures to ensure the authenticity and integrity of the evidence.

4. Analysis: The collected evidence must then be analyzed to determine its relevance and potential value for the investigation. This may involve reviewing the data for patterns or anomalies, conducting forensics analysis, or interviewing witnesses.

5. Documentation: It is important to document the evidence collection process thoroughly, including the steps taken to preserve and collect the evidence, the individuals involved, and the results of the analysis.

6. Storage: The collected evidence must be stored securely to prevent unauthorized access or tampering. This may involve using secure storage facilities or encrypting the data.

Evidence collection is a complex and time-sensitive process that requires specialized knowledge and skills. It is important to have established policies and procedures in place for collecting evidence and to have trained personnel available to carry out the process effectively. The outcome of the investigation and any subsequent legal or administrative action may depend on the quality and reliability of the evidence collected, so it is crucial to approach evidence collection with care and attention to detail.

Our onsite incident response vehicles.

On call
24*7, 365

 

Onsite Cyber Incident Response with a Vehicle refers to the process of managing and containing a cybersecurity incident while in a mobile setting, such as in a vehicle. This type of incident response is often required in cases where the incident involves a vehicle-based system, such as in the case of autonomous vehicles, connected cars, or mobile command centers.

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